Eyelid surgery doesn’t mean you need to lose what makes you ‘you’

As we age, depending on our genes, our skin loses its natural elasticity and develops little folds in the upper eyelids along with some wrinkles and sagging. That gives the appearance of tired eyes as if lack of sleep.

If the skin is excessive and there is also some soft tissue descent, your eyelids can look hooded or even bulge if there is fat underneath. That makes people feel unattractive.

Of all the operations that I do my two favourite eyelid surgeries are upper eyelid blepharoplasty and ptosis correction. I love the precision of upper eyelid surgery. The skin is beautifully delicate and thin with no underlying fat. There is just the delicate orbicularis muscle underneath.

In blepharoplasty, the aim of the surgery is to remove the excess skin folds, and any descended or protruding soft tissue such as the medial orbital fat pad or descended fat from underneath the brow called the roof fat. I love upper eyelid surgery because I aim to give the patient the best possible result, but without changing their appearance even a bit.

That might sound contrary, but my best result is when the patient fully recovers from their upper eyelid surgery and everybody says to them you look well and they do not have that surgical look. They do not look as though they have been to Hollywood and had surgery three or four times or been tightened and nipped and tucked with fat excised.

I very much respect the patient’s own look. So, if they have a low skin crease I keep the skin crease low and if their family look is to have slightly sleepy eyes, I maintain that, but taking away the excess skin which has been troublesome and has been sitting on their lashes or causing them to have headaches at the end of the day because they constantly have to lift their brows.

Let me tell you a story. The other day I was having coffee with some of my good friends and one of the ladies, who is quite a bit older than me – I think she might be about 75, had a lot of drooping of her upper eyelids.

This drooping had come on over the last 2-3 years, and I noticed that she was hardly able to see out because there was a hood of skin which was crossing about half of her vision, coming down like curtains on either side.

She was always having to put her chin up and try and look out from underneath, and I said to her somewhat tongue-in-cheek, oh you must come by and see me in London some time and I will be able to look after your eyelids and do your eyelid surgery with blepharoplasty. She laughed and said to me “I do not want blepharoplasty. I like my look. It runs in the family. We all have hooded eyes. I would be deceiving my family line.” So I laughed back and said “Okay!”

Two weeks later we met again for coffee, and she said, “You know, I have been thinking about it. I think you are right. I need to reduce these hooded eyelids. I don’t want to get rid of them, I still want to have my family look, but they are getting a bit troublesome. I cannot put on any makeup, and I am having to sometimes prop the lid up with my finger because the darn skin gets in the way. So let’s do it. I will come to London.”

As they say in Hollywood – The rest is history.

By | 2017-12-14T07:21:08+00:00 December 14th, 2017|Aesthetics, Blepharoplasty|Comments Off on Blepharoplasty – Eyelid surgery doesn’t mean you need to lose what makes you ‘you’