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Eating Omega 3

Taking a mixture of fish oils for the two types of Omega 3, called EPA and DHA, plus some Linoleic acid and some Oleic acid from a mixture of Omega 3, 6 and 9 and borage seeds, is contained in some ultra Omega 3, 6 and 9 supplements.
However, even if you cannot find the capsules with the borage, you should be able to find the capsules with the fish oil supplying between 400 and 1200 mg per day.
People’s needs for omega 3 vary, and some people do require the higher dose of up to 1200 mg and some are fine with 400 mg once or twice a day. We recommend at Clinica London that you have a minimum of 1000 mg per day. There is a very good product called Omega Eye, which as you might have guessed is for the eye. That particular product involves taking either a teaspoon of the fish oil a day, or four capsules during different parts of the day to get the right dose. If you only take one capsule, you are probably only going to get about 250 mg, but if you take four a day, you will get the 1 g that is sure to be close to what you require.
There is a very good product called Omega Eye, which as you might have guessed is for the eye. That particular product involves taking either a teaspoon of the fish oil a day, or four capsules during different parts of the day to get the right dose. If you only take one capsule, you are probably only going to get about 250 mg, but if you take four a day, you will get the 1 g that is sure to be close to what you require.
We have not come across any real side effects of Omega 3, so I cannot see why everybody is not taking this. I certainly remember as a child my mother feeding me teaspoons of cod liver oil. We did not mind it, but a lot of people hated its taste and used to make a big fuss about it. I liked it because I knew it was good for my brain. At that time fish oils were being touted as being good for brain development. Since then we have come to realise that taking fish oil is also good for the eyes, the skin and the oily glands in the eyelids.
I mention oily glands in the eyelids because we are seeing so many more patients with blepharitis and meibomian gland dysfunction at Clinica London than we ever did before and the age group is widening. Of course, we get some children under the age of 10, but the majority of our patients with blepharitis and meibomian gland dysfunction are young, healthy adults of working age between the ages of about 25 and 55.
They often have intensive jobs that entail them looking at screens for many hours a day, and several of our patients work with two or three very large screens. Their eyes do not get a chance to blink or rest, and so they are not squeezing the oil with each blink onto the surface of the eye. They are not distributing the oil across the tears to stop them evaporating, and they are gradually getting sluggish, lazy meibomian glands which are not going to look after them well.
I also see this in a range of ages because it struck home to me how older people are also getting meibomian gland dysfunction, blepharitis and dry eyes. We had one particular lady who was spending about 12 hours a day on her iPad or mobile phone playing games. This astounded me. How could of anybody of that age be playing so many games? I certainly have always associated computer games with my nephews and nieces, who now in their mid-20s, have spent the last almost 20 years playing with computer games and to them, it is completely second nature. But now we are getting grannies playing computer games, and quite rightly so. If they are a bit bored, they need mental stimulation, they need fun, they need enjoyment and so one way they get that is playing computer games. But alas, it is also affecting their eyes, and many of them are getting dry eyes.

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